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Take the *Free* Credit and Blame Type Assessment (CBTA):

Sample Custom Credit and Blame Type Assessment (CBTA) ReportWhen it comes to the social dynamics of credit and blame, perceptions matter. Leaders have different styles of assigning credit and blame, and different styles can be perceived as more or less effective and motivational in different situations, roles, and organizations.

The Credit and Blame Type Assessment (CBTA) report is intended to help you reflect on the ways in which others likely perceive how you assign credit and blame. The report provides questions to ask yourself and others over time as you develop your leadership skills.

The credit and blame self-assessment was developed by Ben Dattner in partnership with Robert Hogan of Hogan Assessment Systems,
and Performance Programs, Inc., based on the Hogan Development Survey.


About the Credit and Blame Assessment

Credit and blame are at the heart of organizational psychology and career success. How you assign credit or blame to yourself and others is a critical factor in professional development, workplace relationships, dynamics within and between teams, organizational culture, and leadership performance. There is a high degree of subjectivity in how people assign credit and blame to themselves and others, and it's important to know how the way in which you assign credit and blame may be perceived by others. When it comes to the social dynamics of credit and blame, perceptions matter. Leaders have different styles of assigning credit and blame, and different styles can be perceived as more or less effective and motivational in different situations, roles, and organizations. Successful leaders are often highly self-aware, and socially sensitive, about the challenges and opportunities of credit and blame, and are able to effectively adapt their style in different circumstances in order to motivate others, to create cohesive and loyal teams, and to recognize and reward good performance while holding people accountable for results.

Reading Your Report

The report is intended to help you reflect on the way in which others perceive how you assign credit and blame. It details several leadership "styles" and provides percentile scores that indicate how likely it is that the people who work with you or for you will perceive that you fit those various styles. The report is intended to be a point of departure that encourages you to explore how you currently assign credit and blame, and how you might more productively assign credit and blame in the future. The report is not intended to be a substitute for open and candid feedback from your colleagues, peers, and supervisors, which is helpful to solicit on an ongoing basis at any stage of your career, not just for issues of credit and blame, but for all aspects of leadership. The CBTA is not intended to provide any definitive "answers," but is instead intended to provide questions for you to ask yourself and others over time as you develop your leadership skills.

Options:

  • Take the free Credit and Blame Self-Assessment
  • View a Sample Credit and Blame Self-Assessment Report

 

 

 




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How Better Assessment Can Improve Individual, Team, and Organizational Success
by Ben Dattner
Free Press/Simon & Schuster: March 15, 2011; ISBN-10: 143916956X; ISBN-13: 978-1439169568; Hardcover/eBook; 256 pages

Available at: Amazon, BN.com, Apple iTunes


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